Superfamily BOMBYCOIDEA (177 species)

Family EUPTEROTIDAE (16 species)

Subfamily EUPTEROTINAE (7 species)

Eupterote multiarcuata Holloway (Part 3, p. 64). Sundaland. Lowland.

Eupterote naessigi Holloway (Part 3, p. 64). Sundaland. Lowland. Note 76. Note 76. Leong (2009j) has described and illustrated the development of the larva of Eupterote naessigi from the final instar. The larva is generally a rich dark brown with tufts of secondary setae on slight verrucae in rings on each segment, themselves within a broad blackish ring, separated from each other by a square zone with paler speckling in three irregular longitudinal bands dorsally, the outer bands whitish, the central one more yellowish. These are separated by a narrower black stripe from a broad dorsolateral pinkish-white, brown-speckled stripe down the whole body. The head is paler, fawn, with dark brown markings. The long setae are interspersed with stiff, radiating spines (see also the next note). The larva built a silken cocoon within and holding together a loose network of leaves, the cocoon being reinforced with the larval setae and spines. The head and thorax of the pupa were glossy black and the abdomen was dark brown and densely pubescent. It is strikingly different from that described in the next note. The host plant was Bridelia tomentosa (Euphorbiaceae).

Eupterote harmani Holloway (Part 3, p. 68). Endemic. (Lowland, upper montane).

Eupterote obsoleta Talbot (Part 3, p. 65). Endemic. (Lowland).

Eupterote niassana Rothschild (Part 3, p. 66). Sundaland. Upper montane. Note 77. Note 77. Leong (2008c) has illustrated and described the final instar larva and metamorphosis of what was originally identified as E. niassana in Singapore. However, further correspondence (2010) involving W.A. Nässig, who reared a similar larva in Peninsular Malaysia and identified the adult female extracted dead from the pupa as a species of Sphingognatha, indicates that the Singapore female is probably also of this genus, possibly S. asclepiades, a male of which was also illustrated by Leong (2008c). The pupal characters described below in comparison with those for Eupterote in the previous Note could therefore prove to be of generic significance. The larva is dark brown, densely hairy, the hairs concealing rows of densely packed, sharp spines about 8mm long. W.A. Nässig (in litt.) noted that these spines had barbed hooks that meant that they lodged in human skin when the larva was handled, requiring extraction one by one with fine forceps! The spiracles are conspicuously pale yellow, and the head has paler brown areas. The glossy brown pupa is unusually shaped, with the thoracic area appearing swollen, ovate, separated from the abdomen by a constriction. Two further  constrictions on the abdomen divide it into three rather globular parts. The host plants recorded were species of Ixonanthes (Ixonanthaceae).

Sphingognatha asclepiades C. & R. Felder (Part 3, p. 66). Sundaland. Lowland. Note 77. Note 77. Leong (2008c) has illustrated and described the final instar larva and metamorphosis of what was originally identified as E. niassana in Singapore. However, further correspondence (2010) involving W.A. Nässig, who reared a similar larva in Peninsular Malaysia and identified the adult female extracted dead from the pupa as a species of Sphingognatha, indicates that the Singapore female is probably also of this genus, possibly S. asclepiades, a male of which was also illustrated by Leong (2008c). The pupal characters described below in comparison with those for Eupterote in the previous Note could therefore prove to be of generic significance. The larva is dark brown, densely hairy, the hairs concealing rows of densely packed, sharp spines about 8mm long. W.A. Nässig (in litt.) noted that these spines had barbed hooks that meant that they lodged in human skin when the larva was handled, requiring extraction one by one with fine forceps! The spiracles are conspicuously pale yellow, and the head has paler brown areas. The glossy brown pupa is unusually shaped, with the thoracic area appearing swollen, ovate, separated from the abdomen by a constriction. Two further  constrictions on the abdomen divide it into three rather globular parts. The host plants recorded were species of Ixonanthes (Ixonanthaceae).

Sphingognatha muluana Holloway (Part 3, p. 67). Endemic. (Upper montane).

Ganisa generic group (9 species)

Ganisa plana Walker (Part 3, p. 69). Oriental tropics to Sundaland. (Lowland). Note 78. Note 78. Nässig et al. (2009) indicated that the montane race of Ganisa plana is a distinct species, and work is in progress to review the entire Sundanian fauna of the genus.

Ganisa sp. of plana group (Part 3, p. 69, montane form). Endemic. (Upper montane forest). Note 78. Note 78. Nässig et al. (2009) indicated that the montane race of Ganisa plana is a distinct species, and work is in progress to review the entire Sundanian fauna of the genus.

Ganisa similis Moore (Part 3, p. 69). Himalaya to Sundaland. (Lowland, lower montane).

Pseudojana perspicuifascia Rothschild (Part 3, p. 70). Sundaland. Lowland.

Pseudojana obscura Holloway (Part 3, p. 70). Borneo, Peninsular Malaysia. (Lowland).

Melanothrix nymphaliaria Walker (Part 3, p. 72). Sundaland. Lowland to (upper montane).

Melanothrix latevittata Grünberg (Part 3, p. 72). Endemic. Upper montane.

Melanothrix fumosa Swinhoe (Part 3, p. 73). Endemic. Habitat uncertain.

Melanothrix alternans Pagenstecher (Part 3, p. 73). Borneo, Peninsular Malaysia (B), Palawan. Lowland.

 


Copyright Southdene Sdn. Bhd. All rights reserved.